comprehend hunger through imagery

Posts tagged “Sudan

Fannie ?

In an effort to reach hundreds of thousands of starving and malnourished people in South Sudan, the first air drops by the International Red Cross in nearly two decades took place in Leer on July 5. Thousands of people waited in the hot sun for emergency food supplies and seed. NBC NEWS

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Famine, by Radhika Chalasani

‘To this day, I think I didn’t necessarily do the right thing’

Some photographers and journalists have a very absolute point of view that you never interfere, because your job is as an observer and you can do the most good by remaining one. I decided a long time ago that I had to do what I could live with in terms of my own conscience, so when it felt appropriate to try to do something, I would. There are certain situations you struggle with. We’re interfering with a situation by our very presence, and that automatically changes the dynamic. At one point, I was photographing a woman carrying her son into a feeding centre. He was extremely malnourished, and I was photographing her as she walked along. All of a sudden, these Sudanese people started directing her for the photos. They had her sit down and were indicating how she should hold her child. I ran to get a translator, and said, “Tell her to take her child to the feeding centre. She should not be stopping because I’m taking a photograph.”

Another time, there was a family sitting under a tree just outside the feeding centre, about 10 feet away. But they couldn’t walk, they were so emaciated. And there was a group of photographers all around them. I took a few pictures, but then I walked into the feeding centre and asked a nurse, “Is there anything you can do for this family?”

I’ve been in situations where it’s been a hard call, though. On one occasion, a group of photographers went into an abandoned refugee camp and found a massacre site. There were some children who had survived. There were two baby twins in a hut: I tried to get one child to take my hand and realised it had been chopped off. We didn’t know how long they had been there. And it’s in the middle of a civil war, so you’re not sure how safe things are.

Myself and another photographer wanted to take the kids out of there in the car. Several of the other people didn’t think it was safe, in case we got stopped at a checkpoint, and they wanted to get back for their deadlines. In the end, we didn’t take the children. We found the Red Cross and reported the situation to them, but I found that another photographer went there the next day and found another child who was a survivor. To this day I think that I didn’t necessarily do the right thing.

I do believe that our main contribution is trying to get the story understood. And sometimes, when you think you’re helping, you’re actually making a situation worse. But, for me, you try to do what you can live with.

 

 


The Water Children of Jamam Refugee Camp, South Sudan.

The sprawling Jamam refugee camp in Upper Nile State, South Sudan houses 36,500 vulnerable people who have fled across the border from their homes in Blue Nile state to escape the ongoing fighting between Khartoum’s government troops and the Sudanese People’s Liberation Army – North.

Photographs and Text by Tom Stoddart


Inside South Sudan: Pete Muller Photographs Yida’s Refugees

In many ways, Yida is the South Sudan of popular imagination. Small Cessnas, ferrying medicine and other essential supplies, land on a tattered airstrip lined with beleaguered faces. The sprawling landscape is scorched and unforgiving. What little vegetation existed has been slashed and used by the camp’s more than 20,000 inhabitants to build basic shelters. Modest huts, made entirely of wood and thatch, dot a landscape that seems wholly unfit for human settlement.

Read more: http://lightbox.time.com/2012/04/26/pete-muller/#ixzz1tqbF2tQ7

 


Situation in Southern Kordofan by CHRIS KELLY

In January this year, I crossed over from Yida refugee camp situated on the border between South Sudan and Sudan, into the Nuba Mountains in Southern Kordofan; a state roughly the size of France. I went to meet the Sudanese People Liberation Army – Northern Sector (SPLA-N), a rebel army that have been fighting a war with the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) since June 2011. All the international media, NGO’s and aid agencies that pulled out then have yet to return. link

 


Kevin Carter

three months after photojournalist Kevin Carter won the Purlizer price, of a undernourished girl in Sudan, he committed suicide

source: Ad Busters UK